Tag

Ukraine

avenuedeleurope
1024 560 Dominique de Villepin

Europe-Russie : des bruits de bottes

Invité de Véronique Auger dans l’émission « Avenue de l’Europe, le mag » sur France 3, Dominique de Villepin s’est exprimé sur les risques conflictuels qui pèsent sur les relations qu’entretiennent la Russie et l’Europe. Il est également revenu sur le lien privilégié et historique qui unit la France à la Russie, et sur le rôle de médiateur que devrait jouer notre pays dans un tel contexte.

rttv
1024 559 Dominique de Villepin

L’Europe et la Russie ont des intérêts communs

Répondant aux question de RT France, Dominique de Villepin a donné sa appelé la diplomatie européenne à prendre en compte les intérêts et les peurs des uns et des autres, afin de favoriser un dialogue constructif avec le voisin russe et d’enrayer la crise ukrainienne

 

cooperation
1024 614 Dominique de Villepin

For Greater Europe We Must Embrace People-To-People Cooperation

– Dans une tribune en anglais publiée par le Huffington Post, Dominique de Villepin et Igor Ivanov, ancien ministre des Affaires étrangères de Russie, se prononcent pour un renforcement des liens entre la Russie et l’Europe –

We can only watch with sadness the effects of the last few years brought on by confrontation. In 2003, as ministers of foreign affairs, we were at the forefront of the common initiatives between Germany, France and Russia to create a new spirit of dialogue and understanding. We saw the reunification of the European continent after 2004 as a chance to develop new and stronger ties between Europe and Russia because of their shared histories, cultures and needs. Let’s be clear: Hopes are now shattered.

The crisis in Ukraine is a common challenge for Russia and Europe because we see the terrible effects of warfare in Europe again, with over 5000 victims in Ukraine already. It is a common challenge because there are many risks to see a failing state in the middle of Europe — one in need of financial aid beyond reach either of Russia or of Europe. We need to keep on the track of diplomacy, however hard and however frustrating it can be. We must continue with the ‘Normandy format’. We must continue to work on a day-to-day basis on the Minsk II agreements. But we also need to be conscious of one truth: There will be no fast solution in Ukraine.

This is all the more dramatic as the ongoing crisis in Ukraine has raised many questions not only about the fate of the Ukrainian state, but also about the future of international cooperation mechanisms in the Euro-Atlantic space.

In the security domain, the Russia-NATO dialogue about a common security space has been stalled. Instead, NATO announced plans to deploy new military infrastructure in Central Europe. Russia, in turn, proceeded with a large-scale rearmament program.

The trade and investment between Russia and EU that looked so dynamic and promising only two years ago are clearly running out of steam. The negative impact of an unfortunate “war of sanctions” between Moscow and Brussels is not limited to specific businesses on both sides. It also undermines mutual trust, curtails long-term development projects, and casts a shadow over the bold vision of a common market stretching from Lisbon to Vladivostok.

The information media confrontation between the East and the West has reached an unprecedented scale. “Experts” on both sides make full use of the old Cold War rhetoric. Mutual suspicions, misperceptions and even outright lies become a common feature of our life, like it was 30 or 40 years ago. There is the will among some to use sanctions as a tool for regime change, repeating again the mistakes of the past and the misconceptions of the national feelings.

Under the circumstances, it is hardly surprising that both in Russia and in Europe, there is now talk about the second Cold War. The Greater Europe project, which many politicians, experts and opinion makers from many European countries have been trying to promote since mid-1980s, now looks like a fantasy completely detached from reality. Neither Russia nor Europe can afford a new “Cold War.”

Indeed, the situation in Europe today does give too many arguments to pessimists. The future of Greater Europe is unclear and murky, to say the least. The crisis in Ukraine has almost completely erased this vision from agendas of politicians and analysts in the East and the West of our continent. And those who do not want to give up on Greater Europe should review and revise their approaches in light of the Ukrainian crisis. One of the realistic, albeit ambitious, priorities today may be to promote the common European or even Euro-Atlantic humanitarian space of civil societies. Though security, economic and humanitarian social dimensions of European politics are interconnected and interdependent, it is the people-to-people dimension that should receive special attention in the times of trouble.

A key characteristic of the people-to-people cooperation is in its multifaceted, extremely diverse and complex nature. This cooperation includes a whole universe of directions and engaged actors, formats and levels, communities and networks. The “fabric” of humanitarian ties between the people might look thin and fragile, but it often proves to be much more “crisis-resistant” than security or even economic interaction.

Over the last 10 years, civil society humanitarian cooperation emerged as one of the most successful and least controversial areas of EU-Russia cooperation. Its institutional framework was set back in 2003, when Moscow and Brussels constituted the Common Space of research and education, including the cultural cooperation as well. Over last 10 years, we’ve seen thousands and thousands of innovative projects uniting students and scholars, civil society leaders and journalists, artists and intellectuals from Russia and Europe. These contacts have gone far beyond Moscow and Brussels, engaging participants from remote regions, small provincial towns and rural areas. Moreover, this kind of humanitarian cooperation has proved to be unquestionably beneficial to both sides.

The crisis in and around Ukraine pushed the issue of humanitarian cooperation to the sidelines of political discussions. Experts and politicians on both sides seem to be preoccupied with other more urgent and more critical matters. One can conclude that during these hard times with all the risks and uncertainties involved, it makes sense to put matters of humanitarian cooperation on a shelf, until the moment when the overall political situation becomes more favorable for such cooperation. We believe that such a “wait and see” approach would be a strategic mistake. It is exactly in the period of a deep political crisis when interaction in education, culture and civil society should be given a top priority.

The Ukrainian crisis is not a compelling reason for us to abandon the strategic goal of building a common European and Euro-Atlantic humanitarian space. Of course, the crisis made this goal much harder to achieve, but it did not change the fundamentals. Russia is a country of the European culture. It belongs to the European civilization, and its science, education and its civil society institutions gravitate to Europe more than to any other region of the world. A common humanitarian space is not a pipe-dream. It remains a natural point of destination for the West and the East of our continent. However, keeping the strategic goal in mind, we should also think about damage limitation, about how to mitigate the negative impact of the Ukrainian crisis on the fabric of the humanitarian cooperation between Russia and Europe. Two urgent tasks appear to be of particular importance in the midst of the crisis.

First, it is necessary to protect the ongoing people-to-people cooperation from becoming yet another bargaining chip in the game of sanctions and counter-sanctions. To the extent possible, the people-to-people dimension of the EU-Russia relations should be insulated from the negative developments in security, political and economic dimensions.

Second, this humanitarian cooperation should be used to counter inflammatory rhetoric, projection of oversimplified and false images, and spread of Manichean black and white views on European politics, which we see emerging both in the East and in the West. We should not have any illusions: If the current trends in public moods in Russia and in EU are not reversed, it would be extremely difficult to restore our relations, even when the Ukrainian crisis is resolved.

There are many specific actions needed to accomplish these tasks. We should try to promote “success stories” in Russia-Europe humanitarian cooperation between civil societies, which we have accumulated plenty in various fields. We should oppose any attempts to tighten the visa regime between Russia and EU. We should encourage more contacts between Russian and EU regions, sister-cities and municipalities, including trans-border contacts. We should invest heavily into youth exchanges, school children and students mobility. We should upgrade cooperation between Russian and European independent think tanks and research centers. We should broaden existing channels for a range of participants to EU-Russia NGO interaction, making sure that this interaction is not monopolized by any particular group of institutions with their specific political agendas. We should explore new ways to make cultural diplomacy between the East and the West of Europe more efficient. We should pay special attention to building more contacts between Russia and EU media. We should investigate opportunities associated with cultural tourism.

The list of immediate actions can be continued. These actions might look less spectacular than a highly publicized security agreement or a multi-billion euro energy deal. But we should never forget that, at the end of the day, relations between Russia and the West are not limited to contacts between state leaders, diplomats, uniformed men or even between business tycoons. These relations are mostly about ordinary people — their fears and hopes, frustrations and expectations, and their day-to-day lives and plans for the future.

Without the human factor involved, nothing else is likely to work. But we would like to propose one action that can be taken immediately, one action that could be a symbol of determination and of hope, one action toward the youth of Europe and Russia. In the same way as France and Germany reconciled with the Elysee Treaty in 1963 by creating a common agency for the youth, we would like to see the premises of a Russian-European reconciliation through the creation of a Russian-European Youth Agency based on student exchanges, fellowships for entrepreneurial and innovative initiatives, support for language training, and many other actions.

Dominique de Villepin et Igor Ivanov, former Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
26 avril 2015, Huffingtonpost.com

criseukraine
1024 576 Dominique de Villepin

Sur la crise ukrainienne

Lors d’une interview avec Ruth Elkrief sur BFM TV, Dominique de Villepin revient sur la crise ukrainienne et sur le rôle joué par la Russie dans ce pays

russie-crainte
1024 680 Dominique de Villepin

La Russie veut être crainte

– Dans une tribune publiée par Paris Match, Dominique de Villepin analyse le retour en force de la Russie sur la scène internationale –

 

La peur est à nouveau aux frontières de l’Europe. Et l’Europe ne semble plus savoir à quel saint se vouer, oscillant entre reculades et rodomontades. Il est temps de retrouver la raison, d’analyser la crise en Ukraine avec réalisme et lucidité et de bâtir des initiatives diplomatiques fortes. Le premier fait, c’est que la crise ukrainienne exprime une volonté claire et délibérée de la Russie. Car que veut la Russie ?

Elle veut, à défaut d’empire, reconstituer une grande Russie. Elle fonde ses revendications sur des critères de langue et de peuple. Le principe d’autodétermination des peuples, né à la fin de la Première Guerre mondiale, est d’application kafkaïenne en Europe orientale où les peuples, les langues, les confessions se sont toujours mêlés tout en étant ballottés au gré de l’Histoire entre les quatre grands empires des Habsbourg, des Hohenzollern, des Ottomans et des Romanov. Une « terre de sang » où courent les cicatrices à vif de toutes les guerres et de toutes les folies totalitaires du XXe siècle.

Dans son projet impérial, la Russie se heurte non seulement au droit international, mais aussi aux réalités de la géographie. Renoncer à l’Ukraine ou en tout cas renoncer à un territoire en couloir du sud-ouest au nord-est de l’Ukraine, c’est renoncer à la perspective même lointaine d’un territoire compact. La Russie a d’ores et déjà un territoire enclavé avec la poche de Kaliningrad entre pays Baltes et Pologne. Elle a désormais avec la Crimée une presqu’île devenue une île – pour l’heure sans pont et sans liaisons aisées. La Transnistrie formerait une nouvelle enclave au cas où les choses s’envenimeraient. Ce morceau d’Ukraine russophone – désigné depuis peu d’un nouveau nom de mauvais augure, Novorossia – est donc pour elle comme la pièce centrale du puzzle impérial. Il est donc probable que le « rouleau compresseur » russe va poursuivre son avancée, que ce soit par l’annexion ou par la domination étroite d’une entité fédérale au sein de l’Ukraine.

Autre aspiration de la Russie : elle veut, à défaut d’être respectée, être crainte. Ce serait une grave illusion de croire que la politique menée est celle d’une poignée d’ultras qui imposent leurs vues à une population qui voudrait tendre les bras à l’Europe de l’Ouest. Une large part de la société russe, nostalgique non de l’économie soviétique mais de la grandeur patriotique qu’elle offrait, soutient cette politique et même y incite. L’administration russe est poussée à la surenchère et, comme les mauvais génies, les démons nationalistes sont difficiles à faire rentrer dans la bouteille une fois qu’ils en sont sortis. D’autant que la position européenne, en face, n’est guère impressionnante avec ses accords de gribouille qui ne tiennent pas deux jours, ses sanctions en papier mâché et ses condamnations morales qui ne mènent à rien.

Le second fait majeur, c’est que la crise ukrainienne n’est pas une crise de plus dans un monde hérissé de dangers. Elle est en train de définir un nouvel ordre international. D’abord parce que cette situation a une valeur exemplaire. La réalité de ce début de XXIe siècle, c’est la résurgence des nationalismes humiliés, en Russie vis-à-vis de son étranger proche, comme en Chine face au Japon. Ne nous y trompons pas, l’attitude que nous adopterons aujourd’hui décidera aussi de ce que fera la Chine aux Diaoyu, aux Spratly, aux Paracel. Ensuite parce que cette crise nous projette dans un monde où tout le monde peut dire non mais où plus personne n’a la force de dire oui. C’est le temps des puissances négatives qui rompt le consensus mondial nécessaire pour résoudre les crises. Les effets s’en feront moins sentir en Europe orientale qu’en Syrie, en Afrique, en Asie du Sud-Est. Et peut-être en Iran, ce qui signifierait manquer une occasion unique.

Division ou neutralité, les seuls choix de l’Ukraine

Nouvel ordre international enfin parce que c’est la mondialisation même qui est en danger. Ce que nous risquons, ce n’est pas tant une nouvelle guerre froide – quelle en serait l’idéologie et quel en serait le projet d’expansion mondiale ? – mais bien plutôt le risque d’une cassure de la mondialisation.
Cassure de l’élan économique de la mondialisation tout d’abord, à l’heure où les vulnérabilités sont grandes. Les plaies de 2008 ne sont pas pansées à l’Ouest, mais les marchés, anticipant une meilleure conjoncture à l’Ouest, retirent leurs capitaux des pays émergents où ils s’étaient réfugiés, et cela au moment même où la croissance y connaît des ratés. Ainsi les monnaies émergentes ont-elles été attaquées tout au long de l’année 2013, le real brésilien et la roupie indienne tout autant que la livre turque ou le rouble. Nous pourrions très bien voir la crise ukrainienne, à cause du renchérissement du gaz, à cause de la multiplication des crises politiques, provoquer des récessions dramatiques et peut-être même une rechute de l’économie mondiale comparable à 2009.

Mais nous risquons plus grave que cela, nous risquons une cassure de la mécanique même de la mondialisation. Depuis trente ans, la croissance mondiale repose sur un pacte tacite : puisque nous profitons tous des interdépendances, les émergents se coulent dans le moule des institutions et règles du marché que les Occidentaux ont mis en place pour eux-mêmes, et les Occidentaux font mine de ne pas se rendre compte qu’on leur emprunte. C’est une sorte de politesse de la mondialisation.

La grande révélation de la crise ukrainienne, pour les pays émergents, c’est que ces institutions, ces outils sont autant de moyens de pression sur eux en cas de gros temps politique. C’est vrai pour les agences de notation, par exemple, et pour une foule d’autres instruments financiers tels que les audits ou les plateformes de paiement par cartes de crédit, c’est vrai aussi pour Internet. Dès lors, la tentation est forte pour les grands émergents de se doter d’une mécanique parallèle et de créer un nouveau système économique qu’ils contrôlent pleinement. Faire cela dans une logique d’affrontement, c’est casser durablement les échanges. C’est casser trente ans de croissance. Voilà de quoi faire réfléchir de part et d’autre.

A crise globale, réponse globale

Ces deux constats, la compréhension de ce que veut la Russie et la prise en compte des conséquences sur l’ordre mondial de ce qui se joue ici, doivent amener les Européens à renverser la table diplomatique et à faire preuve d’initiative à trois niveaux. A crise globale, réponse globale. La solution de l’équation actuelle n’est ni à Washington, ni à Bruxelles, ni à Moscou. Elle est, paradoxalement, à Pékin, où l’on ne dit rien. Pékin attend, pensant être gagnant au durcissement des positions qui renforceront le prix de son arbitrage. Allons au contact. Allons en Chine afin de rappeler la nécessité pour la communauté internationale à défendre des principes communs et anciens qui fondent le droit international : l’inviolabilité des frontières et la non-ingérence dans les affaires politiques d’un pays souverain. Un mot de la Chine aux oreilles de la Russie aura plus de portée que mille mots hurlés à tue-tête par les Européens et les Américains. Peut-être pourra-t-on demander de même aux Américains si le moment est vraiment bien choisi d’étendre leur parapluie militaire au-dessus des îles Diaoyu, comme ils viennent de le faire.

La crise d’Ukraine c’est aussi une crise régionale. Il faut offrir une porte de sortie acceptable pour tous. Le choix entre la division ou la neutralité, c’est aujourd’hui, comme entre 1949 et 1952 pour l’Allemagne, le seul choix diplomatique réel. Sans doute faut-il proposer avant qu’il ne soit trop tard la « finlandisation » de l’Ukraine, c’est-à-dire la garantie de son indépendance par tous en échange de sa neutralité, comme le choix fut fait en Finlande en 1945. Cela laissera le temps de reconstruire une relation de confiance entre Europe et Russie qui est plus indispensable que jamais.
Il y a enfin une crise nationale ukrainienne que nous oublions trop vite. Sa résolution est la clé de la suite des événements. L’Ukraine souffre de la faiblesse de l’Etat, de l’atonie et de la dépendance de son économie et de la corruption de ses élites. La fédéralisation du pays ne peut être l’antichambre de la partition. Pour cela, il faut à Kiev un Etat stable et respecté, légitimé par les élections et offrant des garanties culturelles à toutes les minorités, et il faut une reconnaissance par tous de l’unité de l’Ukraine.

2 mai 2014, Paris Match

ordremondial
1024 512 Dominique de Villepin

Naissance d’un nouvel ordre Mondial

– Dans une tribune publiée par Paris Match, Dominique de Villepin dresse le bilan des crises qui traversent le monde en 2014 –

La peur est à nouveau aux frontières de l’Europe. Et l’Europe ne semble plus savoir à quel saint se vouer, oscillant entre reculades et rodomontades. Il est temps de retrouver la raison, d’analyser la crise en Ukraine avec réalisme et lucidité et de bâtir des initiatives diplomatiques fortes.

Le premier fait, c’est que la crise ukrainienne exprime une volonté claire et délibérée de la Russie. Car que veut la Russie?

Elle veut, à défaut d’empire, reconstituer une grande Russie. Elle fonde ses revendications sur des critères de langues et de peuples. Le principe d’autodétermination des peuples, né à la fin de la Première Guerre Mondiale est d’application kafkaïenne en Europe orientale où les peuples, les langues, les confessions se sont toujours mêlées tout en étant ballottées au gré de l’Histoire entre les quatre grands Empires des Habsbourg, des Hohenzollern, des Ottomans et des Romanov. Une « terre de sang » où courent les cicatrices à vif de toutes les guerres et de toutes les folies totalitaires du XXe siècle.

Dans son projet impérial, la Russie se heurte non seulement au droit international, mais aux réalités de la géographie. Renoncer à l’Ukraine ou en tout cas renoncer à un territoire en couloir du sud ouest au nord est de l’Ukraine, c’est renoncer à la perspective même lointaine d’un territoire compact. La Russie a d’ores et déjà un territoire enclavé avec la poche de Kaliningrad entre pays baltes et Pologne. Elle a désormais avec la Crimée une presqu’île devenue une île – pour l’heure sans pont et sans liaisons aisées. La Transnistrie formerait une nouvelle enclave au cas où les choses s’envenimeraient. Ce morceau d’Ukraine russophone – désigné depuis peu d’un nouveau nom de mauvais augure, Novorossia-  est donc pour elle comme la pièce centrale du puzzle  impérial. Il est donc probable que le « rouleau compresseur » russe va poursuivre son avancée, que ce soit par l’annexion ou par la domination étroite d’une entité fédérale au sein de l’Ukraine,

Deuxième aspiration de la Russie : elle veut, à défaut d’être respectée, être crainte. Ce serait une grave illusion de croire que la politique menée est celle d’une poignée d’ultras qui imposent leurs vues à une population qui voudrait tendre les bras à l’Europe de l’Ouest. Une large part de la société russe, nostalgique non de l’économie soviétique mais de la grandeur patriotique qu’elle offrait, soutient cette politique et même y pousse. L’administration russe est poussée à la surenchère et comme les mauvais génies, les démons nationalistes sont difficiles à faire rentrer dans la bouteille une fois qu’ils en sont sortis. D’autant que la position européenne, en face, n’est guère impressionnante avec ses accords de gribouille qui ne tiennent pas deux jours, ses sanctions en papier mâché et ses condamnations morales qui ne mènent à rien.

Le deuxième fait majeur, c’est que la crise ukrainienne n’est pas une crise de plus dans un monde hérissé de dangers. Elle est en train de définir un nouvel ordre international.

D’abord parce que cette situation a une valeur exemplaire. La réalité de ce début de XXIe siècle c’est la résurgence des nationalismes humiliés, en Russie vis-à-vis de son étranger proche, comme en Chine face au Japon. Ne nous y trompons pas, l’attitude que nous adopterons aujourd’hui décidera aussi de ce que fera la Chine aux Diaoyu, aux Spratley, aux Paracels.

Ensuite parce que cette crise nous projette dans un monde où tout le monde peut dire non, mais où plus personne n’a la force de dire oui. C’est le temps des puissances négatives qui rompt le consensus mondial nécessaire pour résoudre les crises. Les effets s’en feront moins sentir en Europe orientale qu’en Syrie, en Afrique, en Asie du Sud est. Et peut être en Iran ce qui signifierait manquer une occasion unique.

Nouvel ordre international enfin parce que c’est la mondialisation même qui est en danger. Ce que nous risquons, ce n’est pas tant une nouvelle guerre froide – quelle en serait l’idéologie et quelle en serait le projet d’expansion mondiale ? – mais bien plutôt le risque d’une cassure de la mondialisation.

Cassure de l’élan économique de la mondialisation tout d’abord, à l’heure où les vulnérabilités sont grandes. Les plaies de 2008 ne sont pas pansées à l’Ouest, mais les marchés anticipant une meilleure conjoncture à l’Ouest retirent leurs capitaux des pays émergents où ils s’étaient réfugiés, et cela au moment même où la croissance y connaît des ratés. Ainsi les monnaies émergentes ont-elles été attaquées tout au long de l’année 2013, le real brésilien et la roupie indienne tout autant que la libre turque ou le rouble. Nous pourrions très bien voir la crise ukrainienne, à cause du renchérissement du gaz, à cause de la multiplication des crises politiques, provoquer des récessions dramatiques et peut être même une rechute de l’économie mondiale comparable à 2009.

Mais nous risquons plus grave que cela, nous risquons une cassure de la mécanique même de la mondialisation. Depuis trente ans, la croissance mondiale repose sur un pacte tacite : puisque nous profitons tous des interdépendances, les émergents se coulent dans le moule des institutions et règles du marché que les Occidentaux ont mis en place pour eux-mêmes et les Occidentaux font mine de ne pas se rendre compte qu’on leur emprunte. C’est une sorte de politesse de la mondialisation.

La grande révélation de la crise ukrainienne, pour les pays émergents, c’est que ces institutions, ces outils sont autant de moyens de pression sur eux en cas de gros temps politique. C’est vrai pour les agences de notation par exemple et pour une foule d’autres instruments financiers tels que les audits ou les plateformes de paiement par cartes de crédit, c’est vrai aussi pour internet. Dès lors, la tentation est grande pour les grands émergents de se doter d’une mécanique parallèle et de créer un nouveau système économique qu’ils contrôlent pleinement. Faire cela dans une logique d’affrontement, c’est casser durablement les échanges. C’est casser trente ans de croissance. Voilà de quoi faire réfléchir de part et d’autre.

Ces deux constats, la compréhension de ce que veut la Russie et la prise en compte des conséquences sur l’ordre mondial de ce qui se joue ici doit amener les Européens à renverser la table diplomatique et à faire preuve d’initiative à trois niveaux:

A crise globale, réponse globale. La solution de l’équation actuelle n’est ni à Washington, ni à Bruxelles, ni à Moscou. Elle est paradoxalement, à Pékin, où l’on ne dit rien. Pékin attend, pensant être gagnant au durcissement des positions qui renforceront le prix de son arbitrage. Allons au contact. Allons en Chine pour rappeler la nécessité pour la communauté internationale à défendre des principes communs et anciens qui fondent le droit international : l’inviolabilité des frontières et la non-ingérence dans les affaires politiques d’un pays souverain. Un mot de la Chine aux oreilles de la Russie aura plus de portée que mille mots hurlés à tue-tête par les Européens et les Américains. Peut-être pourra-t-on demander de même aux Américains si le moment est vraiment bien choisi d’étendre leur parapluie militaire au-dessus des îles Diaoyu comme ils viennent de le faire.

La crise d’Ukraine c’est aussi une crise régionale. Il faut offrir une porte de sortie acceptable pour tous. Le choix entre la division ou la neutralité, c’est aujourd’hui, comme entre 1949 et 1952 pour l’Allemagne, le seul choix diplomatique réel. Sans doute faut-il proposer avant qu’il ne soit trop tard la « finlandisation » de l’Ukraine, c’est-à-dire la garantie de son indépendance par tous en échange de sa neutralité, comme le choix en fut fait en Finlande en 1945. Cela laissera le temps de reconstruire une relation de confiance entre Europe et Russie qui est plus indispensable que jamais.

Il y a enfin une crise nationale ukrainienne que nous oublions trop vite. Sa résolution est la clé de la suite des événements. L’Ukraine souffre de la faiblesse de l’Etat, de l’atonie et de la dépendance de son économie et de la corruption de ses élites. La fédéralisation du pays ne peut être l’antichambre de la partition. Pour cela, il faut à Kiev un Etat stable et respecté, légitimé par les élections et offrant des garanties culturelles à toutes les minorités et il faut une reconnaissance par tous de l’unité de l’Ukraine.

30 avril 2014, Paris Match